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Ejaculation Death Rattle

Ejaculation Death Rattle – O (right click + saves as)

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There are some things that never step out of the shadows. Some objective facts which remain confidential. Facts that no one knows about, or wants to know about.
It applies to the true essence of financial capitalism (i.e. to artificially create movement of values based on a monstrous nothing-system whose self-proclaimed autonomy seems to have no other purpose than going deeper and deeper into dehumanization), or about how a streaming service such as Spotify chooses to split the benefits made from its use of other’s people music (i.e. just try and ask them…), or to the sporadic activities of Canadian collective Ejaculation Death Rattle (i.e. brilliant and adventurous as their name suggests).

Ejaculation Death Rattle is one of those bands you come across at the very end of a too long wandering on the interweb, but only if you’re temporarily lucky. EDR never benefit too much publicity, nor were conveniently propelled by an influent music journalist into some fancy à-la-mode musical sub-genre. Too bad for them.

Freak folk, experimental electronics, weird improv… All those names could nonetheless fit them transiently. But EDR just doesn’t belong to a genre, it rather subsumes them all through each extreme “song”. Inside EDR, who cares about your service number, what only matters is the final electric cloud.
EDR is a a group from Vancouver, simply a true and dynamic improvisation/improvised collective who knows no boundaries.

Ejaculation Death Rattle – Valley Accent (right click + save as)

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Ejaculation Death Rattle – Pinkblueyellowstreaky (right click + save as)

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Heather, from their crew, sent us two other beautiful examples of what they do.

1. Ejaculation Death Rattle – Live At The Secret Location (right click + save as)

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“Live recording from a Spring Equinox party at a warehouse space in Vancouver called the Secret Location, recorded in 2009. It’s a bit old now, but maybe it is somewhat timely since I see that Grrrnd Zero was (and perhaps still is?) facing venue challenges in Lyons. Reading through the posting on the collective’s site, the troubles sound sadly similar to what’s been happening in Vancouver for a number of years – many groups that contribute so much to the city’s underground arts and culture have lost the spaces in which they work and host events because of zoning regulations and/or ridiculously high rents and little to no rent control. The Secret Location is an artist studio/jam space with an anarcho-feminist mandate that has run for 7 or 8 years now in varying states of stability. This recording is from one of the events that took place in the space.”

2. Ejaculation Death Rattle – Day-glo (right click + save as)

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“More recent – from Feb. 2012, and from a jam session for a Day-glo Mardi Gras performance at a downtown gallery/shop called Blim. I’ve attached a picture from the event with this email just for fun, because day-glo is fun!”

Get Ejaculation Death Rattle – Room 304.

Room 304 is an album released in 2007 by the courageous netlabel NoType.
There is a lot of deviant music to be found, freely shared under the CC BY-NC-ND licence, on their website.
An attempt to describe the sounds on Room 304 could be (assembling words from the album’s credits) : “ominous throbbing, buzzing of wasps, melodious deception, wailing spasms” + “screeching tires, low end rumbling, air raid sirens, herald of pestilence” + “amplified rust scratching, sawtooth scrapes, cheap and destructible strung plywood, ethereal string manipulation” + “the swelling of leeches, CPU shrapnel, microtonal dentist drill, pure waveform alchemy, transcendental pulsation”.
See?


EDR also released a series of Lathe cut in 2010, via the excellent Fluorescent Friends label.
Naturally, they also share all those contents. They rule.

So also get Ejaculation Death Rattle – Lathe Series.

EDR.
NoType + Panasopria.
Fluorescent Friends
.

War For Sharing : News from the front

The Copyright Justice League delude themselves a lot.
One of their most recent illusion is that Commercial Streaming will make Culture Sharing obsolete, while an old one is that enforcing copyright laws will stop or strongly curtail Culture Sharing (although Hadopi was a massive failure in France, the USA are about to start an analogue program).
In A&D manifesto, we said strenghtening copyright laws is absurd and inefficient, and that “when we’ll be able to store all the music ever recorded and all the books ever written in a hard disk as tiny as a fingernail, it will probably seem more and more strange to buy digital culture products one at a time.” We should have added “Why would we need streaming services when we’ll have such personal storage?”.
Here, Glyn Moody provides some data arguing that this kind of hard disk could materialize sooner than expected, and that even very harsh penalties do not stop Culture Sharing.

 

1 – Spotify in a box

Most people will be familiar with Moore’s Law, usually stated in the form that processing power doubles every two years (or 18 months in some versions.) But just as important are the equivalent compound gains for storage and connectivity speeds, sometimes known as Kryder’s Law and Nielsen’s Law respectively.

To see why, consider that the IBM PC XT had a 10 Mbyte hard drive when it was launched in 1983, which meant you couldn’t even fit a single song on it. Similarly, the first widely-used modem, the 1981 Hayes Smartmodem, had a maximum speed of 300 baud: to transfer a digitized song using a dial-up connection would have taken around 500 hours.

With those kind of figures, it’s easy to see why the recording industry underestimated the threat that file sharing would become once the Internet arrived: based on the past, it was almost inconceivable that people would ever swap music between computers. Of course, once that did start to happen, and the shape of the future became obvious to many, the industry nonetheless wilfully ignored the facts and the trends at every turn, when instead it should have taken the lead in re-inventing media for the Internet age.

That woeful history of refusing to accept the implications of rapidly-advancing technologies makes this prediction, found via Slashdot, even more fateful:

Technologies that will make it possible to expand disk density include heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which Seagate patented in 2006. Seagate has already said it will be able to produce a 60TB 3.5-in. hard drive by 2016.

Assuming Seagate or someone else delivers, that 60 terabyte hard disk could store around 10 million typical MP3 files. A year ago, Spotify was said to have 15 million tracks, which means that you could store most of today’s Spotify on that future Seagate drive. Spotify is likely to grow even larger by 2016, but it probably won’t grow as fast as the storage capacity of hard disks, so there will be some point in the not-too-distant future when you can place all of its holdings on a single hard disk: Spotify in a box.

Obviously, few people will choose to do that, but storing your favorite million songs will not only be realistic, it will be cheap — and even portable. Provided the transfer rate to and from such disks also keeps up with the growth in capacities — an indispensable technological requirement, otherwise they become impossible to use — this means that people will be able to move around huge collections of music, without ever touching an Internet connection. That makes all those three-strikes plans moot, since you won’t actually need your broadband line in order to swap files with friends. You’ll just plug in your portable hard drives to a common computer and exchange stuff directly (as it already happens with today’s terabyte-sized portable disks).

In an ideal world, we would also see a kind of constant scaling of the intelligence of the recording industry, such that by 2016 it would finally accept that trying to stop sharing — whether online or off — is simply pointless. Somehow, though, I think we’ll just have to make do with the other variants of Moore’s Law.

2 – North Korean Study Confirms It: People Will Share, Whatever The Risks

The previous lines are somewhat theoretical, based on general trends in technology; but here’s some supporting data from a rather unusual source: North Korea (aka the “Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” – DPRK).

It comes in the form of an extensive study entitled “A Quiet Opening: North Koreans in a Changing Media Environment” (pdf). It’s long but really worth reading for the insights it gives into a world that has been almost entirely hidden from the West for half a century. Rather surprisingly, it shows the impact that the physical sharing of pirated materials from South Korea and elsewhere is having on the once isolated nation. As TorrentFreak puts it:

With Internet unavailable to all but a tiny percentage of the elite, citizens of North Korea are obtaining their information through other means, notably file-sharing devices such as DVDs, MP3 and MP4 players, and USB drives.

The vast majority of those music and video players are owned by young people:

“About 70-80 percent of people that have MP3/4 players are young people,” a 44-year-old male who left DPRK in 2010 reports. “When you do a crackdown of MP3/4 players among high school and university students, you see that 100 percent of them have South Korean music.”

That’s significant because the penalties for anyone caught with forbidden music and videos are severe: depending on how the offense is viewed, punishments can range from 3 months unpaid labor to 5 years in a prison camp if the media originates from South Korea… TorrentFreak makes the obvious connection:

Despite the massive risks, young people in the DPRK are apparently prepared to defy the regime by consuming unauthorized media anyway, something they have in common with the US youth who share files in the face of $150,000 statutory damages.

That explains why the copyright industries’ current approach to enforcement isn’t working, and — more importantly — why it will never work, no matter how harsh the penalties become. Whatever the risks, people will carry on sharing.

Soliloquy 1 : Jooklo & Troglosound

Neokarma Jooklo Experience in Villanova dello Judrio (Virginia Genta, Maurizio Abate, Christian Zandonella, Andrea Gulli, Luca Massolin, David Vanzan)

Since Sun Ra started to leave Earth in the 70s in a pharaonic egotrip towards greater territories, it seems like there is a crucial « cosmic-occult » vector to explore the heavy catalog of outsider-musics. Something has emerged, perhaps as a sub-sub-musical-genre, as an aesthetic and communitarian alternative, lying in metaphysics dreams, vortexes and parallel dimensions.

Some hippie enthusiasts gathering around perception tools as reliable as the love of stars or multi-dimensional travels? The search of meta-terrestrial musics? Why not? Sounds alright, actually.
However, the lazy assemblage of multicolored triangles decorating the 1512th new-age-generic-drone cassette of 2012 might make you feel perplex about the sincerity of such a practice — i.e. the sickening amount of undeserved references to cosmos, psychotropic drugs, pagan ceremonies and so on… Sadly, today these pervading keywords are associated with a vague network of synthetic, kinda-cute-and-nicely-prepared-for-facebook-communication bedroom-projects, which for the most part are frankly dispensable.

Above this black viscid mass of new musics fancying themselves as “psychedelic”, there are a few resistant groups obsessed with producing — through ancient techniques you could have thought extinct in the fast-production-consumption era — rough, unpolished, both corporeal and spiritual musical forms .
There is for example an unfamiliar island close to the Italian coast where an audacious group of individuals are united under the mysterious banner “Jooklo”.

The Jooklo, a system in orbit around Virginia Genta’s and David Vazan’s hyper-duo, develops in various ramifications corresponding to many circumstantial groups/layouts : “Golden Jooklo Age“, “Neokarma Jooklo Experience/Trio/Sextet“, “New Jooklo Age”… many names that could fit perfectly your future local Order of the Solar Temple lodge. These numerous micro-structures prove the difficulty of drawing limits to the Jooklo sound ; the identity of the participants, the instruments, the sonic techniques, geographics, all these elements are hard to determine. What remains is the explicit message that a sincere affective community is struggling with a blurry mathematics to build a peculiar, psychedelic and physical entity they name Troglosound.
Troglosoud is the platform from where they broadcast their rugged forms of musics we could in a way call “ritualistic”. But not ritualistic as a bad joke, not as a senseless and out-of-context imitation, but as the genuine practice of people who fly high. Unlike 2010s’ plastic psychedelism, this is something rooted in immaterial traditions, this is something funnily hippie from a time which predates the digital revolution. 

The Jooklos, like some nonchalant and highly sympathetic Luddites, are certainly having a lot of fun playing around with all these cultural anachronisms. You can most likely meet them in the course of one of their numerous tours, while traveling with an extensive band of desperados, or in a smaller format. I assume that they spend the rest of their time looking after their label (an activity they prove to excel in) and other stuff I would not even assume.
Virginia and David play a lot as a duo these days. It sounds like some primitive and very explosive free-jazz. Sometimes Bill Nace, the super-guitar-noise-hero, joins them in an improv fury.

Bologna with Bill Nace

To understand what their new obsession is about :

Jooklo Duo – Time Over (right click + save as) – Unreleased take, rec January 2010, Tenor Sax Virginia Genta, Drums David Vanzan

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Jooklo Duo – I (right click + save as) – From “Free Serpents” LP, Qbico, September 2007, Tenor Sax Virginia Genta, Drums David Vanzan

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Jooklo Duo – Gimme Five (right click + save as) – Unreleased take, rec january 2012, Tenor Sax Virginia Genta, Drums David Vanzan

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Jooklo Quartet – Crossing (right click + save as) – From “Where has jazz gone?” LP, Troglosound, March 2011, Baritone Sax Virginia Genta, Double Bass [Upright Bass] Tero Kemppainen, Drums David Vanzan, Electric Guitar Topias Tiheäsalo

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Jooklo Duo – Grooving (right click + save as) – From “High” cdr, Troglosound, April 20102, Tenor Sax Virginia Genta, Drums David Vanzan

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Download and pay your respect to the Jooklo Duo pack.

Or watch :

From a recent gig, 8th June, “in a place that has been squatted on that same day by a group of high-school kids”

Jooklo Duo in the woods

Cedric “Acid Kirk” Stevens

The adventurous multi-modal label/blog/broadcast program Discrepant feeds us with another outsider gem. An introduction to the great work of Cedric “Acid Kirk” Stevens, member of 5-piece psychedelic noise ensemble South Of No North.
A 2×12″ LP impetuously named The Syncopated Elevators Legacy has just been released, and it’s time for you to start assembling the clues that will lead you to Stevens’ majestic territories.

Cedric Stevens – Glicerine Militante (right click + save as) – Juno 106, Analogue Modular System recorded in The Hermetic Garage in 2004 – (…a discrepant & subliminal toy crash collision)

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“The elevators were born from an urgent need to distance oneself from the techno pigeon hole and the already established Acid Kirk moniker. It was a turning point for me in the techno movement; I could feel it falling apart under the media hype and my instinct, as a composer was to detach myself from that scene.

1997 was the year I decided to start afresh with a strong intention of developing a different sound with more ambitious structures. It was to my great surprise however, that my simplest attempt, “Vanda”, became the definite turning point of my new musical career. The Apostasy EP was conceived to be the departure point from a convoluted, hyperactive style that was very much in vogue with the then burgeoning IDM scene. In fact, “Vanda”, because of its innocent nature and the equipment used (pure electric wave generators: VCO’s, LFO, ADSR), its simplicity in shape and intuitive creation (it was made in a few hours) made this track all the more authentic and personal. This undeniable fact made me realize that I had unconsciously laid down the foundations of my very own musical expression and that the emotions in that sound reflected my very own self-being with a melancholic nature that was (and stays) the essence of my personality.

It was a revelation, and the intensive use of home made analogue modular systems during my techno years gave me the experimental foundations that cemented all of the forthcoming SEL work. This same awakening pushed me to become less indulgent as a musician and the elevators story became the story of my very own development as an artist finding his own voice.

The next chapter on the SEL history was exclusively based on the auto feeding results of electric currents, serpent patching or infinity looping if you like. Because of the never ending patching possibilities modular systems can offer, I threw myself into an electrical current looping frenzy- the results, way mellower than you’d imagine, were released on The Siamese Level. First conceived as an LP, I constantly questioned the quality of some of the compositions and took almost three years before being completely satisfied of the result. I wanted the record to be so perfect that it eventually became an EP sacrificing more than 20 compositions in the process, settling finally for 3 main tracks and 3 interludes – the result was more than satisfactory.

After the release of “The Siamese Level” my life became somehow chaotic and the following record clearly carries the stigmas of certain wounds. In Still Between the Battle & the Sheet my aim was to incorporate more concrete elements into my electrics mixture. I organized several recording sessions with musician friends, both professionals and amateurs, so I could reach this more ‘musique concrete’ result. One of the sessions perfectly transmitted the sentimental anarchic state I was in; broken china, Tibetan gongs, fragmented toy sounds, a very wrecked and destructive approach. In addition I also wanted to transmit a more eventful side to my music, in contradiction with the more pastoral drones of “The Siamese Level”. The evolution of recording techniques through the use of computers also highly influenced my working habits and one can tell by listening to these recordings. The mixture of chaos with the constant desire to innovate perpetually connected with SEL, gave birth to this 3rd record. I was aware of the flaws at this stage, being more conflicted interiorly it transpired into the tracks and the mix had trouble finding a coherent whole. The title of the EP reflects this; it’s clearly a record “between heaven and earth.


The use of guitars and Larsen phenomena gave a new lease of life to the SEL dynamic whilst allowing me to pursue my fascination with electric circuits in conjunction with a more straightforward human intervention. This new path allowed me to create with more precision and serenity the mix between concrete and machine;
“Siam Electric Skyline” is, in my opinion, the perfect example of this fusion.

The constant evolution of my experimentations with SEL soon pushed me to create a real live band and it was natural for SEL to fade away as my need to melt into an ensemble and interact with other musicians became paramount.

It’s only since 2008 that the need to return to a solitary form of expression returned. The musical baggage accumulated with South Of No North radically changed my approach to composition and particularly its interpretation, pushing me from now on to use my birth name when working solo. Truth be said, the sonic excursions of SEL will always remain the foundations of my musical language, making this anthology a perfect introduction to my work.”

Cedric Stevens, Barcelona 2012
Unpublished text that should have been originally used as sleevenotes for the The Syncopated Elevators Legacy LP

 

Discrepant and Stevens also just put up for free download a magnificent EP called The Politics Of Weakness (right click + save as), showing the same taste for electronic mastery and complex sonic topographies. You have no excuse for not getting it right now, seriously.

The Politics Of Weakness

…a Discrepant & Subliminal Toy Crash collision
CAT: CREP04
released 31 May 2012
all tracks written & produced by Cedric Stevens
Artwork by Vassilis Economidis

 

Cedric Stevens - The Politics Of Weakness 01 – Dead Man (right click + save as) – Prepared guitar and analog modular system. Recorded to DAT in 2006, edited on computer in 2011

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Cedric Stevens – The Politics Of Weakness 02 -  Abstract, As My Failure Does (right click + save as) – Analog Modular System, Flute & TR808. Original material recorded on DAT in 2002 during the “Still Between & The Sheet” sessions. Edited on computer in 2009.

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Cedric Stevens – The Politics Of Weakness 03 – L’Ombilique Des Limbes (right click + save as) – Clarinet, Analogue Modular System, Digital Treatments, Contrabass played by Squeaky Lobster recorded in 2002

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Exotisme phonétique et synth pop de chambre

We, French folks, often go through terrible ordeals when it comes to articulate names of foreign bands without sounding ridiculous or unduly confident.
Conversely, we’re grateful when a foreign band dares to choose a French name, not only because we feel safe pronouncing it, but because we smile inwardly at what it would sound like in the mouth of, say, an English speaker.
So when I first read about Blanche Blanche Blanche I sought phonic examples of how you people might pronounce such a name, but today this mystery remains unsolved, which is highly frustrating.

blanche blanche blanche – runny day (right click/save as)

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Anyway, apart from being a phonological challenge, Blanche Blanche Blanche is a charming duo from Brattleborro, Vermont. Sarah Smith and Zac Philips manage to make songs that are equally buoyant and melancholic, tropical and murky, while sustaining enough eeriness not to sink into stale mannerism. Altogether their music sort of sounds like John Bender’s early 80s ascetic pop mingled with old hazy hits from Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, topped with the vocals of Beat Happening’s Heather Lewis.

blanche blanche blanche – ana’s life

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blanche blanche blanche – results

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Yet sometimes it just reminds me of the British countryside :

blanche blanche blanche – with or without you (right click/save as)

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another great artwork by Shawn Reed

If you like to stick to chronology, you may start out with their first cassettes and albums released on Night People, Feeding Tube Records and OSR Tapes, before pursuing the retrofuturistic journey with their latest LP, Wink with both eyes (get it here). And don’t you grieve when you’re done because a new record of Blanche Blanche Blanche is due out on La Station Radar later this year.

Next time, I suggest you call your future band Bûcherons Bandants, Barbu Barbu, or Purin Malin. Thank you.

THE ACTION BEAT ODYSSEY – part 1 – Last Tour

 Action beat are going to write a serial for A&D, recounting the wonderful life of an extensively touring and highly unfortunate DIY band. Today they’re starting out with the worst moments of their April 2012 EU tour.

So, another successful tour for action beat. What happened this time? Well, we were making enough money so that it looked like we might get to release a limited edition vinyl featuring all the bands on the tour, but…

1) Luke locked the keys in the van, so that was 215€. 

2) The next day, I drove into a bollard, so that will probably be about 500€.  

3) We were fined 200€ by the dutch police for carrying weed. I don’t get how they can say people are allowed 5g each in possession on the street, but then say that you are only allowed to travel with a joint. It all seemed a bit corrupt to me, like they made up the fine on the spot; “How much money do you have? The fine depends on the amount of money you have”. “Okay, we have nothing”. “We don’t believe you”. FUCK OFF.

4) In Hamburg, we had to share a bedroom with the most vile human beings we’ve ever met in our lives. The worst behaved, most delinquent, childish band ever, ‘BUCKET FLUSH‘. Their documentary does not do them justice. One of the members of our band was unfortunate enough to share a bunk bed with a member of their group…. he woke up in the morning, soaked, and then realised the guy in the bed above him had pissed himself during the night, and it leaked onto him through the mattress. Not only that, another member had pissed their bed, and one of the geniuses in their band puked between our beds, so we woke up to puke, pissed soaked beds. They then began to wrestle at 8am, and started throwing toilet roll around the room. I kept my cool, but what I really wanted to do was teach them a serious lesson in human conduct. The only way to do this with some people is through violence, though I am forcing myself to become a pacifist now that I am a father. Shame, I could have kicked the shit out of most of them.

5) Last night, we realised a guitar of ours had either been lost or stolen, and despite efforts to find the said guitar, we have thus far been completely unsuccessful. The guitar is pretty much irreplaceable. 

We’re obviously going to continue. Action Beat is a giant cock roach. Or maybe just a giant cock. We’re going nowhere. Try kick us down, we’re back up in seconds. Undefeatable. Pragmatic, and adaptive to most, if not all difficult situations, where most human beings would either give up, or have a nervous breakdown. 

Action Beat is a machine. 

Cheers to everyone that helped us out.

Action Beat – Don0)))Vito (Right Click/Save As)

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Action Beat – Tony Yeboah (Right Click/Save As)

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Action beat live in the car park (Caen, France):

Happy May Day, Comrade

 

Happy May Day, comrade. It’s a holiday that is widely uncelebrated in my country, even though it is meant to commemorate the Haymarket Massacre, which happened in my hometown, Chicago. According to Wikipedia, the US government instead assigned May 1 such comical/Orwellian names as ‘Americanization Day,’ ‘Loyalty Day,’ and ‘Law Day.’ In any case, if you’ve got the day off or are working an 8-hour day (rather than a 14-hour day, or at least getting overtime pay), you’ve got unions, socialists, and anarchists of past generations to thank for it.

For today’s post we’ll talk about the Ex‘s 1936, the Spanish Revolution double 7″. Those who know the Ex can probably already attest to the beauty of this release, but I’ll get to that in a minute. First I want to talk about the spanish revolution itself. It was a pretty special thing; it’s not every day that ordinary people come together to create a relatively well-implemented anarchist economy and society.

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GRRRND ZERO – Call For Support + Stunning Video Compilations

Grrrnd Zero is a bunch of naïve enthusiastic volunteers / activists with no leader, whose ambition is to develop an open and fastidious auto-run space dedicated to underground / unconventional / DIY / alternative arts in Lyon, France. Grrrnd Zero did hundreds of insane shows in the past seven years.

Most of the Amour & Discipline crew is highly involved in Grrrnd Zero.

Grrrnd Zero sure is a strange venue :

  •  We try to offer affordable rates, from free donation (for example, we hosted Deerhoof, Tune Yards, Dirty Projectors, Black Dice or Deerhunter on a free donation basis) to €10 maximum (for big bands such as Animal Collective or A Silver Mt Zion), and people who don’t have enough are welcome anyway.
  •  Promotors of an event can keep the benefit from the tickets and bar. They just have to give a small contribution to Grrrnd Zero.
  •  The audience doesn’t have to drink or eat what they’re offered at the bar. Anyone can bring their own food or drinks.
  •  We do not use professional security services.
  •  Our wish is to spread underground culture beyond the limited circle of those who are already on board. This is why we keep handing out flyers and pasting up posters in the streets, the subway, universities, everywhere.

Problem is, the city hall of Lyon wants to evict us.

So we need you to write an email to the city of Lyon on the behalf of Grrrnd Zero. You just have to ask the city hall to help find us another place. We need it to evidence the significance and reach of Grrrnd Zero beyond Lyon, as part of a broader global DIY community.

In order to motivate you, here come two video compilations of shows at Grrrnd Zero:

. Un futur bien peinard (A Cushy Future): Kickball / Deerhoof / Xiu Xiu / Fat 32 / Black Dice / Animal Collective / François Virot / Kickball / Daniel Higgs / Ours Bipolaire.
. Fin du monde bientôt (The End is Nigh): Melt Banana / Pneu / Deerhunter / Clara Clara / Lighting Bolt / Chewbacca / Volcano The bBar / Pif Le Chiant.

Please stream, download and above all share them as much as possible.

And if you like them, why not consider writing to the city hall of Lyon ?

 —

A CUSHY FUTURE / UN FUTUR BIEN PEINARD

Download Un Futur Bien Peinard Video (right click+save as)

 

THE END IS NIGH / FIN DU MONDE BIENTÔT

Download Fin du monde bientôt Video (right click+save as)

 

Should you send an email to the City Hall, Brad Pitt and Beyoncé will most likely perform belly dances on your kitchen table and you will be granted a million well-deserved dollars, transferred directly to your account from the president of a Nigerian bank. However, if you don’t send it to anyone and don’t write a letter of support, your children will perish, and passers-by will spit on their corpses.

Thanks a million. Please share this article. We will sing your praises for all eternity.

You can find information about Grrrnd Zero and how to help us by reading below. You can also read the article Anna Barrie (from Dubai and the late These Are Powers) wrote on Impose.

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Mattin Teaches Us About “Anti-Copyright : Why Improvisation and Noise Run Against The Idea Of Intellectual Property”

Mattin publishes his thoughts and music under the no-licence of Anti-copyright. Here we have reblogged one of his short essays taken from his website, which appeared in the Noise & Capitalism book.

 

Property is theft
– Proudhon 

Intellectual property is shit
– Billy Bao

 No other type of music-making contradicts itself through its recording like improvisation does. In this essay I intend to explain certain aspects inherent within the practice of improvisation and noise that counter the idea of intellectual property practically and conceptually. While many musicians would probably argue in favour of getting rid of any notion of authorship, and sharing their recordings, there is often a lack of discussion about this aspect of musical practice. Almost all the people that I know are downloading music, but people rarely talk of the consequences. Some people tell me it is very utopian or naïve to think that one can get rid of copyright and intellectual property, but to a certain extent it is already happening in practice. Most of the music that is heard in the world is likely to be from downloads using different peer to peer (P2P) networks such as Soulseek, Amule or Bittorrent, or one-click hosting pay websites such as Rapidshare. Because of its rigid and bureaucratic structure, the law is always left behind by the questions posed by new technologies. But, apparently, it is only a matter of time before the law catches up. Right now repressive measures aided by technologies of surveillance and control are already being developed without our consent by the most powerful governments under the pressure of corporations (ACTA being a good example)(1). Should we allow them to do this or should we start to develop our own platforms outside of the ideological framework that lets them behave this way? I will argue that the practice of improvisation in itself questions the foundations upon which intellectual property is based, such as: authorship, rights, restrictions, property, and the division between production and consumption. Improvisation and noise distribution, with their hardcore DIY (do it yourself) aesthetics, indicate alternatives to the mainstream means of production and distribution of music. Both practices are intertwined and share many things in common, but I am taking their obvious characteristics as a way of showing that within these types of music-making, there is already an existing critical attitude towards copyright that should be deepened and developed consciously.

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Keep Off The Stage

At the start of last year, ‘The One Ensemble’ (Daniel Padden, Shane Connolly, Alex South and myself), made a decision: that we would, wherever possible, forgo the use of the PA. There were myriad reasons for this collective decision: our drummer had decided to use a reduced set up and play with a chamber-like quality that allowed his sound not to (always) overpower everyone else; we had a line up of instruments – bass clarinets, accordions, cello – which are often not done justice by the PA; we wanted the vocals to be acoustic; and most importantly, we wanted the freedom to choose where we would locate ourselves in a given space.

Clearly this approach has its limitations; of course we will have to turn down all those invitations to headline massive stadium gigs, and we have to be very careful about balance (we do use amps to boost the cello and guitar to the same volume as the clarinets and percussion). But the payoff has been well worth it. Mostly we play in the round in the centre of a space. The space has to be quite small which has several advantages: it feels very full and intimate, the audience can choose where and what they want to focus on, we experience different relationships with them, they can even sit in amongst us (although nobody has yet). The material we perform has subtly shifted; it feels like we are playing chamber music. There is more interplay between us, and more scope for extending and adapting the music in the moment.

The One Ensemble, Live In Glasgow , november 2011, full show:

 To a lesser extent this approach has also impacted on my solo work. At the Avantgarde festival in June last year I played a solo set and was asked specifically to play without amplification: I didn’t think this would work as the space was a large old barn with enormous open doors at the back. But it did work: the audience listened more carefully and the gig was a nice foil to the loud things happening before and after. The amazing Toys’n’Noise, appearing at the same festival, played in the round, on the floor. As with The One Ensemble shows, the audience had the chance to shift their perspective as the gig unfolded. Though they did play through the PA, they each had amps that helped to localise the sound: it was different, unexpected and visually stunning.

A couple of years ago we played a gig at the Baltic in Gateshead (in the traditional way) where the sound was really tricky. Bad in fact. A Hawk and a Hacksaw played after us and had the same experience. Elements became unpleasant to listen to because the sound just didn’t work. This wasn’t necessarily the fault of the sound technician, the room simply wasn’t built for a PA. At the end of their set they played a couple of encores unplugged, on the floor amidst the audience: it was by far the most powerful and enjoyable thing that happened that night.

Don’t get me wrong: sometimes the PA can be a wonderful thing: some things just have to be loud and some things sound better when amplified, but I think that too often the PA, and the stage for that matter, are used because ‘that’s what people do’ not because it’s what works for the music.

The One Ensemble, Live In Glasgow, November 2011

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Two Peter Nicholson solo tracks. One song (The Sky Has Gone Now, which will blow you away) and one improvised instrumental, recorded at the Candle Festival in Clermont Ferrand, France. Sound is weak, so it would be wise to use Headphones or good speakers and turn up the volume.

Peter Nicholson – The Sky Has Gone Now

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Peter Nicholson – Improv

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